HORT*4420 Fruit Crops

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The following description is for the course offering in Fall 2021 and is subject to change. It is provided for information only. The course outline distributed to the class at the beginning of the semester describes the course content and delivery, and defines the methods and criteria to be used in establishing the final grades for the course.
 

Growth patterns, fruiting characteristics and adaptation to  environmental conditions of fruit crops in temperate regions. Classification, cultural practices including propagation and the physiological principles underlying these practices will be emphasized.

Pre-Requisite(s): 1 of AGR*2050, AGR*2470, BOT*2100

Instructors:

Teaching Assistant:

Leticia Reis

Credit Weight:

0.50

Course Level:

  • Undergraduate

Academic Department (or campus):

Department of Plant Agriculture

Campus:

Guelph

Semester Offering:

  • Fall

Class Schedule and Location:

Please refer to Web Advisor for class schedule and location.

Learning outcomes:

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Understand commercial production of temperate berry crops, grapes and tree fruits
  • Have a general understanding of fundamental growth processes and how these are manipulated through cultural practices to optimize commercial production 
  • Appreciate the unique horticultural aspects (cultivars, pruning, fertility, crop load) of managing berry, vine and tree fruit crops.
  • Understand concepts on how to improve fruit quality through canopy management, orchard and vineyard design, and modern pruning and training systems.
  • Understand the general physiology of perennial fruit species and understand how and why cultural practices are designed and function in temperate climates
  • Have a working knowledge of the anatomy and identification of small fruit and tree fruit species
  • Understand the quality characteristics of small fruit and tree fruit speciesUnderstand the primary components of a modern orchard systems
  • Understand the primary components of a modern orchard system
Literacy
Information Literacy, Quantitative Literacry, Technological Literacy, Visual Literacy
  • extract material from a variety of resources, assess the quality and validity of the material and use it to discover new knowledge.
Communicating
Oral Communication, Written Communication, Reading Comprehension
  • communicate and interact effectively with a variety of individuals and groups, and convey information successully in a variety of formats including oral and written communication. Communicating also comprises attentiveness and listening, as well as ready comprehension. It is the ability to communicate and synthesize information, arguments and analyses accurately and reliably
  • accurately and effectively communicate scientific ideas, arguments and analyses, to a range of audiences, in graphic, oral and written form
Professional and Ethical Behaviour
Teamwork, Ethical Reasoning, Leadership, Personal Organization and Time Management, Intellectual Independence
  • accomplish the tasks at hand with proficient skills in teamwork and leadership, while remembering ethical reasoning behind all decisions. The ability for organization and time management skills is essential in bringing together all aspects of managing self and others. Academic integrity is central to mastery in this outcome. At the undergraduate level, intellectual independence is needed for professional and academic development and engagement.

Lecture Content:

A detailed course schedule is available on the CourseLink.

Course material will be presented in a lecture-laboratory format and in modules where students will work independently. Crop production and physiology will be discussed from a discipline viewpoint with opportunities for discussions about specific species. Topics that will be discussed will include choice of location and site, low temperature injury, cultivars, rootstocks, propagation, pollination, soil management, growth regulators, pest control and management, fruit maturity and harvesting, pruning and orchard systems. Sustainability of production practices will be highlighted where appropriate.

Topics to be covered in lectures include:
  • Introduction to berry crops, site selection, regional and international importance. Strawberry culture, physiology, production, types, anatomy, morphology, growth and development, response to environmental factors, life cycle and management practices, planting and production systems.
  • Brambles (Rubus): culture, physiology, production, types, anatomy, morphology
  • Grape culture, physiology, production, cultivars, anatomy, morphology. Introduction to grape as a trellised species, site and location, anatomy of a grapevine, annual growth and pruning cycles, factors contributing to wine quality, light interception, trellising methods
  • Blueberry culture, physiology, production types, anatomy, morphology
  • Minor berry crops: cranberries, currants, saskatoons and others 
  • The influence of temperature on growth and development of perennial crops
  • World production of fruits, temperate fruits, the Ontario fruit industry, growth stages, and critical temperatures. Orchard site selection. Discussion of climate normals. Fruit tree quality, propagation
  • Rootstocks for Tree Fruits
  • Tree Nuts
  • Understanding hard cider production: traditional and modern processes, cultivar selection, juice analysis and fermentation
  • Orchard systems, training and pruning, tree fruit orchard nutrition and soil management
  • Thinning apple trees with Metamitron and 1-ACC
  • Tree fruit plant regulators, fruit growth and development
  • Plant bioregulators used in tree fruit production
Labs & Seminars:
Labs will complement the lectures and will likely include a visit(s) to commercial growers, and studies of plant material and literature during indoor periods. A schedule will be announced when details of the visits are finalized and indicated on CourseLink. Come prepared for cold, Page 9 of 14
wet weather, etc. All students must complete and sign an indemnification form for each field trip at the scheduled class. An indemnification form will be provided in class. A fee to partially cover transportation (to be determined) will be required on some field trips. Sample products can be purchased at some locations if students wish at their own expense.
 
  • Virtual Field Trips
  • Apple Cultivar identification
  • Methods for analyzing fruit quality

Course Assignments and Tests:

Assignment or Test Contribution to Final Grade

Group Presentation

7.5%

Lecture Quizzes

15%

Participation

7.5%

Midterm Exam

25%

Laboratory Quiz

20%

Final Exam

25%

 

Lecture Quiz 1 (5%)

Periodic quizzes during lecture times will given and will be based on lecture material. There will be up to three online quizzes each worth equal weight toward a total of 15% of your grade. These will be scheduled approx. every 3-4 weeks and the quiz will be available for a short period and then closed.

If a student is not present for the quiz without a valid reason, they will be given a zero. No quiz re-writes will be permitted and no rescheduling of quizzes will be permitted. If a person is absent from a quiz for a valid reason, their mark will be determined from the other quizzes based on the grading method above.

Specialty Fruit Crops Group Presentation (7.5%)

The class will be divided into 5 groups (approximately 6 people per group). You will research a small fruit crop and present it to the class through either a live Zoom or prerecorded PowerPoint presentation. 
This will occur around the first week of October

Lecture Quiz 2 (5%)

Periodic quizzes during lecture times will given and will be based on lecture material. There will be up to three online quizzes each worth equal weight toward a total of 15% of your grade. These will be scheduled approx. every 3-4 weeks and the quiz will be available for a short period and then closed.

If a student is not present for the quiz without a valid reason, they will be given a zero. No quiz re-writes will be permitted and no rescheduling of quizzes will be permitted. If a person is absent from a quiz for a valid reason, their mark will be determined from the other quizzes based on the grading method above.

Laboratory Quiz (20%)

This will cover all information presented during the lab portion of the course.

Lecture Quiz 3 (5%)

Periodic quizzes during lecture times will given and will be based on lecture material. There will be up to three online quizzes each worth equal weight toward a total of 15% of your grade. These will be scheduled approx. every 3-4 weeks and the quiz will be available for a short period and then closed.

If a student is not present for the quiz without a valid reason, they will be given a zero. No quiz re-writes will be permitted and no rescheduling of quizzes will be permitted. If a person is absent from a quiz for a valid reason, their mark will be determined from the other quizzes based on the grading method above.

Final Exam (25%)

The date and time of the final exam is available through WebAdvisor

Participation (7.5%)

Date: To be determined (through course, and lab exercises)

Final examination:

Please refer to Web Advisor for class schedule and location.

Course Resources:

Required Texts:

There is no required text for the course. 

Students will be responsible for selected readings throughout the semester as well as for information contained in material handed out in class and on CourseLink.

Recommended Texts and Reserve Material:
Library Sources of Information:
Journals that are relevant to this course include: J. American Pomological Society, American Fruit Grower, Goodfruit Grower, Canadian Journal of Plant Science, HortScience, Scientia Horticulturae, Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology
 
Some of the following books are on reserve in the library on two-hour loan.
  1. Westwood, N.M. 1993. Temperature zone pomology. 3rd ed. Timber Press, Portland, OR. Teskey, B. J. E. 1978. Tree Fruit Production.3rd ed.  Avi Pub. Co, Westport, Conn.
  2. Childers, N. F., J. R. Morris, and G. S. Sibbet. 1995. Modern fruit science : orchard and small fruit culture. Horticultural Publications, Gainesville, FL.
  3. Galletta, G. J., D.G. Himelrick, and L. E. Chandler. 1989. Small fruit crop management. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.
  4. Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. 2012. Fruit Production Recommendations 2010 – 2011. Queens Printer of Ontario, Toronto. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/pub360/p360toc.htm (August 2011)
  5. Faust, M. 1989. Physiology of Temperate Zone Fruit Trees. Wiley Interscience, New York.
  6. Jackson, D., N. E. Looney, M. Morley-Bunker. 2011. Temperate and subtropical fruit production. 3rd ed. CABI, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK
  7. Baugher, T. A. and S. Singha. 2003. Concise Encyclopedia of Temperate Tree Fruit. Food Products Press, New York, NY.
  8. Eck, P. 1988. Blueberry Science. Rutgers University Press
  9. Hancock, J.F., 1999. Strawberries Crop Production Science in Horticulture. CABI Publishing, Oxon, UK

Students will be responsible for selected readings throughout the semester as well as for information contained in material handed out in class.

Other Resources:

Lab Manual:  None

Other Resources:

Courselink: D2L will be used for this course. 

Internet Sources for Fruit Production

This listing of sites and links on the Internet serves as a way of extracting good quality fruit crop information. It will complement, not substitute for, material in research journals and textbooks listed in the course outline.
More links can be found at: http://www.plant.uoguelph.ca/treefruit/ Click on “Industry Links”. Also, text resources available on D2L CourseLink site and at the Library Reserve Desk 

Recommended Resources

Temperature zone pomology (Textbook) Westwood, N.M. 1993. Temperature zone pomology. 3rd ed. Timber Press, Portland, OR. Teskey, B. J. E. 1978. Tree Fruit Production.3rd ed. Avi Pub. Co, Westport, Conn.
Modern fruit science: orchard and small fruit culture (Textbook) Childers, N. F., J. R. Morris, and G. S. Sibbet. 1995. Modern fruit science: orchard and small fruit culture. Horticultural Publications, Gainesville, FL.
Small fruit crop management (Textbook) Galletta, G. J., D.G. Himelrick, and L. E. Chandler. 1989. Small fruit crop management. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (Textbook) http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/pub360/p360toc.htm Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. Fruit Crop Protection Guide 2018- 2019. Queens Printer of Ontario, Toronto.
Physiology of Temperate Zone Fruit Trees (Textbook) Faust, M. 1989. Physiology of Temperate Zone Fruit Trees. Wiley Interscience, New York.
Temperate and subtropical fruit production (Textbook) Jackson, D., N. E. Looney, M. Morley-Bunker. 2011. Temperate and subtropical fruit production. 3rd ed. CABI, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK
Concise Encyclopedia of Temperate Tree Fruit (Textbook) Baugher, T. A. and S. Singha. 2003. Concise Encyclopedia of Temperate Tree Fruit. Food Products Press, New York, NY.
Blueberrry Science (Textbook) Eck, P., 1988. Blueberry science. Rutgers University Press.
Strawberries (Textbook) Hancock, J.F., 1999. Strawberries crop production science in horticulture. CABI, Publishing, Oxon, UK

Course Policies:

Grading Policies:

Late written assignments without a valid reason will be penalized 10% per day. For poster presentation, a mutually suitable time for student and instructors will need to be rescheduled to evaluate the poster with the student and marks will be deducted at 10% per day until an electronic copy of the poster is submitted to course-link. ( For example, an assignment that is late 5 days, would achieve a maximum of score of 50% (5 x 10%/day= 50% penalty).

Course Policy on Group Work:

Not applicable.

Course Policy regarding use of electronic devices and recording of lectures:

Electronic recording of classes is expressly forbidden without consent of the instructor.  When recordings are permitted they are solely for the use of the authorized student and may not be reproduced, or transmitted to others, without the express written consent of the instructor.

Other Course Information:

Additional Notes
Course Technologies and Technical Support
System and Software Requirements
This course will use a variety of technologies including;
  • CourseLink (main classroom)
  • Zoom
To help ensure you have the best learning experience possible, please review the list of system and software requirements. https://opened.uoguelph.ca/student-resources/system-and-software-require...
CourseLink System Requirements
You are responsible for ensuring that your computer system meets the necessary system requirements. Use the browser check tool to ensure your browser settings are compatible and up to date. (Results will be displayed in a new browser window).
CourseLink
This course is being offered using CourseLink (powered by D2L's Brightspace), the University of Guelph's online learning management system (LMS). By using this service, you agree to comply with the University of Guelph's Access and Privacy Guidelines. Please visit the D2L website to review the Brightspace privacy statement and Brightspace Learning Environment web accessibility standards.
Technical Support
If you need any assistance with the software tools or the CourseLink website, contact CourseLink Support.
Tel: 519-824-4120 ext. 56939 Toll-Free (CAN/USA): 1-866-275-1478
Support Hours (Eastern Time):
Monday thru Friday: 8:30 am–8:30 pm
Saturday: 10:00 am–4:00 pm
Sunday: 12:00 pm–6:00 pm
Teams (via Office 365)
Office 365 Teams is a collaboration service that provides shared conversation spaces to help teams coordinate and communicate information. This course will use Teams for one on one meetings with your Instructor. It is recommended that you use the desktop version of Teams. As a student you are  responsible for learning how to use Teams and it’s features. For Teams Support visit the CCS website for more information.
 
Zoom
This course will use Zoom for lectures. Check your system requirements to ensure you will be able to participate.
https://opened.uoguelph.ca/student-resources/system-and-software-requirements
Technical Skills
As part of your learning experience, you are expected to use a variety of technologies for assignments, lectures, teamwork, and meetings. In order to be successful in this course you will need to have the following technical skills: 
  • Manage files and folders on your computer (e.g., save, name, copy, backup, rename, delete, and check properties);
  • Install software, security, and virus protection;
  • Use office applications (e.g., Word, PowerPoint, Excel, or similar) to create documents;
  • Be comfortable uploading and downloading saved files;
  • Communicate using email (e.g., create, receive, reply, print, send, download, and open attachments);
  • Navigate the CourseLink learning environment and use the essential tools, such as Dropbox, Quizzes, Discussions, and Grades (the instructions for this are given in your course);
  • Access, navigate, and search the Internet using a web browser (e.g., Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer); and
  • Perform online research using various search engines (e.g., Google) and library databases.

University Policies

Academic Consideration

When you find yourself unable to meet an in-course requirement because of illness or compassionate reasons, please advise the course instructor in writing, with your name, id#, and e-mail contact. See the academic calendar for information on regulations and procedures for Academic Consideration:

Academic Misconduct

The University of Guelph is committed to upholding the highest standards of academic integrity and it is the responsibility of all members of the University community, faculty, staff, and students  to be aware of what constitutes academic misconduct and to do as much as possible to prevent academic offences from occurring.

University of Guelph students have the responsibility of abiding by the University's policy on academic misconduct regardless of their location of study; faculty, staff and students have the responsibility of supporting an environment that discourages misconduct. Students need to remain aware that instructors have access to and the right to use electronic and other means of detection. Please note: Whether or not a student intended to commit academic misconduct is not relevant for a finding of guilt. Hurried or careless submission of assignments does not excuse students from responsibility for verifying the academic integrity of their work before submitting it. Students who are in any doubt as to whether an action on their part could be construed as an academic offence should consult with a faculty member or faculty advisor.

The Academic Misconduct Policy is detailed in the University Calenders:

Accessibility

The University of Guelph is committed to creating a barrier-free environment. Providing services for students is a shared responsibility among students, faculty and administrators. This relationship is based on respect of individual rights, the dignity of the individual and the University community's shared commitment to an open and supportive learning environment. Students requiring service or accommodation, whether due to an identified, ongoing disability or a short-term disability should contact the Student Accessibility Services (SAS), formerly Centre for Students with Disabilities (CSD), as soon as possible.

For more information, contact CSD at 519-824-4120 ext. 56208 or email sas@uoguelph.ca or visit the Student Accessibility Services website: http://www.uoguelph.ca/csd/.

Course Evaluation Information

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Your responses will not affect your grade.  Course evaluation data are distributed to individual instructors after final grades have been submitted to the Registrar, following the completion of each academic semester.

Please be honest, respectful, constructive and thorough.  Instructors and review committees place great value on student course ratings and read all comments provided in course evaluations. It is helpful to provide comments on the strengths of the course, in addition to the areas for improvement.  Please refrain from personal comments unless they relate to teaching and learning.

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